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Category: Poets’ Pavilion

The Exposure of War

Photo Credit: Photo by Stijn Swinnen on Unsplash

So Hanun seized David’s servants and shaved off half of each one’s beard. He cut the lower part of their robes off so that their buttocks were exposed, and then sent them away.
2 Samuel 10:4 NET


Wilfred Owen is best known for his WWI poem “Dulce et Decorum Est.” (Latin for “It is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country.”) However, he also wrote the poem “Exposure,” which details exposure to the elements during a time of war.

When we write poems about war, we bear witness to what we feel and experience. War is not just kinetic. Our wounds can be inflicted by words or actions that are meant to shame and humiliate us.

King David’s army lost the battle, but they won the war. We win our battles by acknowledging the God who fights our war.

Poets' Pavilion

Cry Out Hope!

It is because of the Lord’s lovingkindnesses that we are not consumed,
Because His [tender] compassions never fail
.
Lamentations 3:22 AMP


When you think of poetry in the Bible, the Psalms usually come to mind. However, the book of Lamentations is a poetry of the psalms too — a poetry of grief, written by Jeremiah after Jerusalem’s destruction in 586 B.C.

Sometimes grief enters a national stage. Many poets over the centuries are known as national poets writing grief on a national scale. America’s poets from war-torn times include Walt Whitman’s Civil War poems and Philip Freneau’s Revolutionary poems.

Jeremiah, even in his lamentation, wrote a psalm of hope. Amidst all the doom and gloom, the poets also should be the counterweight of hope.

Poets' Pavilion

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